Swedish Museum of Natural History

Institution (Original name) 
Naturhistoriska riksmuseet
MAIN ADDRESS
Street 
Frescativägen 40
Postal code 
11418
City 
Stockholm
POSTAL ADDRESS
Postal address 
P. O. Box 50007
Postal code 
10405
City 
Stockholm
Country 
Sweden
Phone 

(+46) 85 195 40 00

TYPE OF INSTITUTION
Type of institution 
Museum
LEGAL STATUS
Are you part of a larger entity / legal body? 
No
CETAF MEMBERSHIP
Category 
Full member
CETAF Official representative
Name, position, phone, e-mail, research field 

Per Ericson, Director of Science, systematics and evolution of birds, +46 8 51954117, per.ericson@nrm.se

Member of the Executive Committee? 
No
CETAF DEPUTY
OTHER STAFF MEMBERS WITH CONNECTIONS TO CETAF
Name, position, phone, e-mail, research field + Working Group or Project involved in 

Irene Bisang, Senior Grant Liaison Officer, +46 8 51954130, EIAG

Kjell-Arne Johanson, professor and head of the zoology department, systematic entomology, +46 8 51954088, CPB

Member of the Executive Committee? 
No
Director / legal representative of the institution (title, name, phone, e-mail, research field) 

Jan Olov Westerberg, Director of the Museum (jan-olov.westerberg@nrm.se)

Organigram 

Director of the Museum – Research & Collection Division (Per Ericson, Director) with seven departments (directorate, bioinformatics and genetics, botany, zoology, geoscience, paleobiology, environmental research and monitoring). Three additional Divisions: Education; General Operations and Public Services; Administration

Governing and executive bodies 

The museum is a governmental agency

PERSONNEL
Scientific staff 
Permanent (P)Non – Permanent (NP)
a) TOTAL scientific staff6410
b) Scientific staff linked to Collections5513
c) Post-docs / PhD students016
d) Others (Associates, etc.)122
TOTAL (a+b+c+d)13141
Other staff (administration etc.) 
Permanent (P)Non – Permanent (NP)
e) Exhibitions 236
f) Collection Managers / technicians151
g) Others 300
TOTAL (e+f+g) 687
Total permanent staff 
199
Total non-permanent staff 
48
Grand total (permanent + non-permanent Staff) 
247
Male (%) 
49
Female (%) 
51
R&D facilities
How many laboratories are in use in your institution? 
6
List of laboratories 
  1. DNA LABORATORY: DNA preparation, including DNA extraction and PCR etc; 8 Thermal cyclers: 2 AB GeneAmp 9700 (96-well), 6 AB GeneAmp 2720 (96-well). Cloning incubator. DNA sequencing [ABI 3130xl automated sequencer (16 capillaries)]; 454 GS Junior next-generation-sequencer. Ancient DNA laboratory separate from the main lab.
  2. MICROSCOPY: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM): HITACHI S-4300 FE-SEM (including digital and conventional photo equipment). Additional equipment:EDS (Energy Dispersive System), CL (Cathodoluminescence detector also working with low magnification), BSE (Backscatter electron detector, allows material with different compositions to be imaged as different contrast). Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM): LEO 912 AB OMEGA, 80x-500 000x magnification range, 0,2 nm resolution, up to 120 kV acceleration voltages. Multifocus image fusion system: Olympus SZX12 with analySIS software (12 Mpx resolution max). State-of-the-art stereo and light microscopes in well-suited working modules for morpho-anatomical analyses of collections.
  3. GEOSCIENCE: Low-level beta-counter for 234Th determination; Low-level gamma-counter for 210Pb and 137Cs determination in sediments; X-ray diffractometer (PANalytical X'Pert powder) with strip detector; Gas-flow furnace (H2/CO2; 1300°C); UV-Vis spectrophotometer (Zeiss MPM 800) with microscope; 57Fe Mössbauer spectrometer (Wissel) with cryostat; FTIR spectrometer (Bruker IFS55/S) equipped with IR microscope; Crushing and mineral separation laboratory; Clean laboratory for isotope chemistry; Thermal ionization mass-spectrometers (TIMS). Finnigan MAT261, with 5 faraday cups and an analog electron multiplier; Triton with 9 faraday cups and a secondary electron multiplier; Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with multiple collector (MC-ICP-MS), GVI-Isoprobe with 9 faraday cups, a WARP-filter and a Daly-detector; High mass resolution CAMECA IMS1280 ion microprobe: Secondary ionisation, high resolution mass-spectrometer with 5 electron multipliers; CAMECA IMS1280 ion microprobe preparation laboratory and data handling; Computer laboratory for tomographic reconstructions (Avizo); A new advanced microanalytical facility, the Vega center, will open 2014.
  4. BIOINFORMATICS: Searchable databases of all major Swedish Natural History collections (in development); The Swedish node of Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF); various advanced software and expertise for phylogeneny, biodiversity and DNA analyses; access to university high power computer networks.
  5. CONTAMINANT RESEARCH: Gas chromatography lab. 6. Other: X-ray equipment for investigation of animals; FishBase facilities, incl source data and advanced hardware for database analyses, GIS (ArcGIS 10), and other analytical options; Fish preparation laboratory; Autopsy and preparation laboratory for birds and mammals; High resolution scanners and photography equipment for digital imaging of collections.
Exhibitions
Number of permanent exhibitions 
10
List of permanent exhibitions  
Name 
The Polar regions
Name 
The Human Journey
Name 
The Human Animal
Name 
The Swedish nature
Name 
Life in Water
Name 
Mission Climate Earth
Name 
Treasures from the Earths Interior
Name 
Diversity of Life
Name 
A souvenir for Life
Name 
4½ Billion years
Number of recent exhibitions 
5
Recent Temporary Exhibitions (< 2 years) 
Name 
LIFE - a journey through time
Name 
Scrap all animals
Name 
Parasites - life undercover
Name 
Photography close to Nature
Name 
Deeper than light.
Number of current exhibitions 
3
Current Temporary Exhibitions 
Name 
Minidino
Name 
The age of Raptors
Name 
Water
RESEARCH FIELDS
RESEARCH FIELD 
Research Field 
The Changing Earth
Summary of your Research programme 

Traces of the point of onset of life on earth are investigated applying high-resolution isotopic micro-analyses techniques on the best preserved early-Archean rocks in West Greenland. The emergence and establishment of multicellular life in the context of global climatic and atmospherical evolution are explored using integrated geochemical and palaeontological approaches. NRM scientists also investigate the development of the Fennoscandian bedrock and petrogenesis of sulphide and iron ores, flow of elements between different reservoirs of the Earth, the occurrence of major water repositories in Earth’s mantle, and the mineral chemistry at the atomic level. The sources and fate of key trace elements in the marine environment are investigated using improved techniques for the determination of long-lived radioisotopes in low concentrations. Research at the museum’s laboratory for ancient DNA includes studies of the variation in the abundance and distribution of animals in relation to climatic periods and glaciations/interglacials.

Research Field 
Ecosystems and Species History
Summary of your Research programme 

Research is directed at understanding events in evolutionary time through analysis of ancient faunas and floras and their changes in space and time. Focal points are the origin and early evolution of animals, the phylogenetic diversification and ecological radiation of flowering plants and seed plants, and the evolution of modern mammals. Diets of animals, for example marine mammals, are studied by DNA analysis and microscopic examination of gut and/or faeces contents.

Research Field 
The Diversity of Life
Summary of your Research programme 

This research addresses organismal relationships at all levels, the evolution of morphological and other traits and phylogeography, as well as the survey, analyses and description of biodiversity at a global level at organismal as well as genetic levels. NRMs scientists thus contribute directly with critical knowledge to the preservation and management of the world’s natural capital, its biological diversity (EU 2020 Biodiversity Strategy, http://ec.europa.eu/environment/nature/biodiversity/comm2006/2020.htm). An international expert panel recently assessed NRM’s biodiversity research and its scientific relevance as outstanding. The research also benefits from the presence of a world-leading authority in phylogenetic methods.

Research Field 
Man and the Environment
Summary of your Research programme 

NRM leads and participates in national and international monitoring programmes that study environmental contaminants and their effects in terrestrial and marine environments. These studies on levels of environmental contaminants in wildlife cover of the longest time-spans in the world. So do the associated time-series of frozen tissues in the continuously and actively developed Environmental Specimen Bank. The effects of exposure to pollutants on the reproductive and endocrine systems in large marine mammals and links with potential population levels are analysed. Other topics dealt with under this theme concern, bird migration, pollen allergenes and biochemical and geochemical processes of organic substances in the environment. Expertise and collections supporting the research under this theme are unique in Europe.

Scientific publications
Number of peer-reviewed publications per year 
236
Digital copy of the latest annual report 
EARTH SCIENCES (Geology, Mineralogy, Palaeontology,…) 
TypologyPrimary typesIndividual specimens/objects% registered cards% recorded cards in database
1.1Palaeontology600012500000
1.2Mineralogy1881840009889
LIFE SCIENCES (Zoology, Biology, Botany, Mycology,…) 
TypologyPrimary typesIndividual specimens/objects% registered cards % recorded cards in database
2.1Botany100000450000032
2.2MycologyIncl. AboveIncl. AboveIncl. Above
2.3Zoology210000380000014
Total specimens (all collections) 
9,734,000
Outstanding collection features 

Environmental specimen bank: Long time series of more than 333,000 samples from terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems. These high-quality collections are of immense value for molecular analyses and extraction of chemical compounds for ecotoxicological and related studies.

Fossil plants: More than 250,000 specimens consisting of macro-, meso- and microfossils. Particularly important collections from China, Sweden, and polar regions. H.J. Schweitzer collection containing approx. 10,000 specimens from Iran, Afghanistan, Bear Island, Germany and many other remote localities.

Fossil animals: Of an estimated 900,000 items, about half are from Sweden, and most of the remainder from Europe (incl. the Arctic islands of Spitsbergen, Bear Island, Novaya Zemlya and Vaigach).

Vascular plants: Over 3 million specimens, >52,000 types registered to date. Large and unique collections from areas with a high level of biodiversity (e.g., South America and the Caribbean [Herbarium Regnellianum], South Africa). Historical Swartz collections (also covering non-vascular plants). 50,000 pollen and spore slides.

Non-vascular plants & fungi: 1.53 million specimens, including more than 50,000 primary types. Significant lichen collection from S America (G. Malme, R. Santesson). One of the largest bryophyte herbaria worldwide with >715,000 specimens.

Vertebrates: Important and unique material from all continents comprising 163,000 bird, 51 000 mammal, more than 500,000 fish and 50,000 reptile and amphibian specimens.

Invertebrates: Over 580,000 lots of which the mollusc collection, 300,000 lots, is particularly strong in material from high latitude areas and also from hydrothermal vents.

Insects, spiders and myriapods: 3 million specimens of a broad systematic and geographic coverage, and including very valuable historical collections (e.g., De Geer).

Minerals: 180,000 catalogued (digital database) specimens. Rich collections from the famous Långban mines (25,000 samples).

Heritage sciences (art, manuscripts, maps, photographs...) 
Other information regarding heritage collections 

Specimen photos: 735,000; Frozen tissues: 330,000

Genetic Repositories
Does your institution have a DNA bank? 
Yes
Number of DNA samples 
130 000
Does your institution have a seed bank? 
No
COLLECTION’S RELATED INFORMATION
Number of outgoing loans (parcels / specimens) per year 
900/15,000
Number of accessions (specimens) per year 
90,000
Number of scientific visitors per year 
540
MAIN AREAS OF TAXONOMIC EXPERTISE 
Early Metazoans
brittle stars/Ophiuroidea
Acoela, Nemertodermatida, Rhabditophora
Fish, Cichlids
Birds
Molluscs
Insects, Trichoptera, Water Beetles
Carnivorous mammals
Seed plants, high latitude floras, Asterales, Ericales
Pleurocarpous mosses, emphasis on arctic & temperate taxa
Lichenized fungi, Arthoniales
Ascomycetes, Pezizomycetes
Palaeozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic floras
COMMUNICATION MATERIAL
Main activities of communication and outreach 
  • Program activities during the year, e.g. excursions, guided tours, children creative workshop,
  • “Ask the biologist and geologist”, a service for them who have questions regarding nature and animals. The biologist was one of three program leaders in the TV-series “Mitt i naturen vår”, during spring 2014. It was sent in six programs.
  • Press-releases and other information about the research and collections. http://www.nrm.se/ommuseet/press.7038.html
  • Social media, to create public engagement and participation.
  • Cosmonova, an IMAX theatre in the museum for schools and public
Logo 
Contact person at your institution for communications / press / external relations (name, position, phone, e-mail) 

Martin Testorf, +46 8 5195 4037, martin.testorf@nrm.se

Visitors
Last year:  
477 000
Trends (past and future) 

Year 2011: 511 000. Year 2010: 523 000

Website visitors
Last year  
4 530 000
Institution news
Career opportunities
Others
Other means of communication  

Website access to some collection databases with images, virtual exhibitions:

http://www.nrm.se/en/forskningochsamlingar/samlingar/databaser.83.html

http://www.nrm.se/researchandcollections/botany/phanerogamicbotany/virtu...

http://www.nrm.se/english/researchandcollections/researchdivision/palaeo...

Fishbase Sweden, online portable with searchable information about fish: http://www.fishbase.se/search.php

GBIF Sweden, portal for searchable biodiversity information: www.gbif.se

Naturarv, portal for searching of Swedish natural history collections: http://www.naturarv.se/

Swedish DNA-key, in development, portal for DNA sequence queries: http://www.dnanyckeln.se

If your institution is involved with non-university-based teaching or education programmes, please describe them & the partners 

Special programs and guiding for schools and training for teachers. A pedagogics team.

If your institution is involved with universities in teaching or education programmes, please name and describe them 

Formal affiliation with Stockhom university for courses in systematics and taxonomy, as well as supervision of post-graduate students. Additional teaching at various national and international universities.

If your institution is involved in online courses, please describe them and the partners 
If your institution is involved in training projects, please describe them and the partners 

FP7 Marie Curie initial Training Network http://www.mettrans-itn.eu/about-mettrans/

Other relevant information on education and / or training carried out 

Several educational themes and tools in exhibitions. http://www.nrm.se/english/visitthemuseum/exhibitions/swedishnature.975_e...

http://www.nrm.se/english/education.45_en.html

Further, see Communication and outreach.

Contact person at your institution for education / teaching / training (name, position, phone, e-mail) 

Claes Enger, +46-8-51954254, claes.enger@nrm.se Charlotte Ek, +46 (0)8 519 551 26, charlotte.ek@nrm.se

THREE MAIN TOPICS OF CURRENT INTEREST FOR YOUR INSTITUTION 

Systematic research

Digitization of collections

Developing collections database

THREE MAIN TOPICS OF FUTURE INTEREST FOR YOUR INSTITUTION 

Collections management standards and practices

Access and benefit-sharing routines

Developing next phase of the Synthesys project

Last update 
09.21.17